FY! Creative Nonfiction

theparisreview:

“‘I think there are going to be more things like this,’ he continued, ‘but the systems right now are not making space for them. E-books are everyone competing to be a platform, to make some generic platform and control market share. It’s Apple versus Amazon. So as a result, there hasn’t been enough money or attention towards making these apps of new works that validate the narrative possibilities, the storytelling possibilities of these things. But the possibilities are absolutely there.’”
Alex Carp takes a walk with the makers of The Silent History.

theparisreview:

“‘I think there are going to be more things like this,’ he continued, ‘but the systems right now are not making space for them. E-books are everyone competing to be a platform, to make some generic platform and control market share. It’s Apple versus Amazon. So as a result, there hasn’t been enough money or attention towards making these apps of new works that validate the narrative possibilities, the storytelling possibilities of these things. But the possibilities are absolutely there.’”

Alex Carp takes a walk with the makers of The Silent History.


longreads:

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This week’s Longreads Member Exclusive comes from Margot Singer, whose essay “Call It Rape” was published in the Fall 2012 issue of The Normal School. Singer is the author of The Pale of Settlement (University of Georgia Press, 2007), winner of the Flannery O’Connor Prize for…

posted 1 year ago via longreads with 44 notes

storyboard:

Documenting Disappearing London

I pass these stores every day. I pass hundreds every week, maybe thousands each month. It’s rare that I look for longer than I need. But Emily Webber sees them.

Based in Hackney, Emily shoots images of the urban furniture of 21st-century London. Her photos show chicken shops and nail bars; laundromats, kebab shops, hairdressers, cab offices, newsagents, and thrift stores all feature. In an increasingly chainified city, she zeroes in on the beauty and originality of the garish and the mundane. On London Shop Fronts, she has published over 1,200 images so far, running one every morning for almost four years.

Read More


longreads:

This week, we’re excited to share a Longreads Member Exclusive from Thomas E. Ricks, whose new book is The Generals, published by The Penguin Press. Chapter 21, ”The End of a War, the End of an Army,” details how the U.S. military and its leadership faltered in the final years…

posted 1 year ago via longreads with 28 notes

poptech:

smithsonianmag:

 
The December issue of Smithsonian introduces the American Ingenuity Awards. dream hampton profiles Grammy Award winner Esperanza Spalding. Abigail Tucker on the high school sophomore who invented a new way to test for a deadly form of cancer and how one legal crusader is giving young people in America’s prisons a second chance.

Congratulations to 2011 Science Fellow Pardis Sabeti, recipient of the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award for natural sciences. See Sabeti explain how her study of genomes has revealed a new approach to treating infectious diseases.

poptech:

smithsonianmag:

The December issue of Smithsonian introduces the American Ingenuity Awards. dream hampton profiles Grammy Award winner Esperanza Spalding. Abigail Tucker on the high school sophomore who invented a new way to test for a deadly form of cancer and how one legal crusader is giving young people in America’s prisons a second chance.

Congratulations to 2011 Science Fellow Pardis Sabeti, recipient of the Smithsonian American Ingenuity Award for natural sciences. See Sabeti explain how her study of genomes has revealed a new approach to treating infectious diseases.


leslieseuffert:

For five months a year across four years, Japanese artist, Yu Yamauchi lived 10,000 feet above sea level in a hut located at the top of Mount Fuji. Considered one of the most sacred mountains in the country, Mount Fuji has a great influence on Japanese history and culture. In a process that he considered a spiritual account of the morning sunshine, every day, the self-taught photographer would rise and capture the stunning views from his isolated, awe-inspiring vantage point. The results are this series, entitled Dawn, in which Yamauchi transports his viewers into otherworldly places. Taken from the same location, each image represents the ever-changing atmosphere of our planet. Rich, vibrant colors streak across the sky, as piercing rays of sunshine and mounds of puffy clouds fill the frame. Providing us with a rare opportunity to reflect on our planet from an unusual perspective, Yamauchi reminds his viewers that our world is just a small part of a vast and infinite universe.

My Modern Metropolis


"Adrienne Rich
Norman Mailer
W. H. Auden
Susan Sontag
Gore Vidal"
— A partial list of the contributors in the first issue of the New York Review of Books (via millionsmillions)


wwnorton:

FIRST LINES FROM NEW BOOKS OUT THIS WEEK

“The call came late in the morning, the sharp ringing of the telephone echoing off the heavy stones in a Sanaa house. On the other end of the line, an unfamiliar voice crackled through miles of static. ‘Hisham has been martyred,’ the man announced. ‘Congratulations.’”
The Last Refuge: Yemen, Al-Qaeda, and America’s War in Arabia by Gregory D. Johnsen

“Writing in the seventeenth century, the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes argued that human beings are by nature selfish and belligerent. We would gladly kill each other for personal gain, says Hobbes, and only a strong government can curb this basic instinct.”
Beyond Human Nature: How Culture and Experience Shape the Human Mind by Jesse J. Prinz

“We like to think that moral questions have clear answers. It is true that we will probably accept that different people will come up with different answers, but many of us will be discomforted by the idea that some moral questions have no obvious answers at all.”
Would You Eat Your Cat? Key Ethical Conundrums and What They Tell You About Yourself by Jeremy Stangroom

“Determination in the form of a man walks toward you. A metaphor about human transcendence made real and clothed in one hell of a suit.”
The Man Who Would Stop at Nothing: Long-Distance Motorcycling’s Endless Road by Melissa Holbrook Pierson

posted 1 year ago via wwnorton with 42 notes

longreads:

This week, we’re excited to share a Longreads Exclusive from Orion, a publication that has been featured on Longreads in the past, with pieces from Charles C. Mann, Belle Boggs and Sy Montgomery.

“The Creature Beyond the Mountains,” by Brian Doyle, is a story about the giant sturgeon…

posted 1 year ago via longreads with 67 notes